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Lesson Idea For Teaching Floating and Sinking

This investigation of floating and sinking is ideal for junior primary students. Students look at the objects provided and predict if they think that object will float or sink. Students…

Floating and Sinking

This investigation of floating and sinking is ideal for junior primary students. Students look at the objects provided and predict if they think that object will float or sink. Students then test if their predictions are correct by performing the investigation.

The attached worksheet (see link at the end of the post) can be used to document students’ predictions and test results. The students can work with a partner to complete the worksheet, before handling each object to see if their predictions change.

Once the investigation is completed the class could discuss what other objects may float or sink and give their reasons why this may be. A further investigation could be undertaken with plasticine to see if the students can make it float by moulding its shape.

Aim

To determine which objects will float and which objects will sink.

Equipment Required For The Investigation

  • Variety of different shape/size objects;
  • Lens;
  • Bucket/s; and
  • Water.

Procedure

1. By looking at the objects predict if they will sink or if they will float.

2. See if your predictions change by looking through the lens or by holding the objects.

3. Record your predictions.

4. Fill the bucket with water and place the objects into the water.

5. Record if the objects float or sink and compare this with your original predictions.

Click the link to download the Floating and Sinking worksheet: Floating and Sinking Worksheet

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3 Comments

  1. Carrie

    Love this idea! Looks like it would be a lot of fun! I usually center my floating and sinking lessons around themes and do it multiple times per year to make sure it really sinks in!

    Reply
  2. JoAn

    One of my favorite things to teach! Especially when you can find something really big that doesn’t sink!

    JoAn
    Tiny Toes

    Reply
    • Melinda

      Hi JoAn,

      Thanks for stopping by! I like to use a rolled up piece of plasticine to show how it sinks and then use that same piece to shape it so it doesn’t sink. I love listening to kids explain why they think it then floats 😀

      Reply

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